Is there a secret to living a long, quality life?  According to Colin Milner, the CEO of International Council on Active Aging at Galloway Ridge, there’s not.  He suggests that it starts with the people and the culture at Galloway brought from its residents. Colin continued that, “Once we get past the age of 50, 65, 70, 80- whatever it may be, life does not stop. Life continues”.  

An award-winning author and known for his public speaking events, Colin Milner has left a sizeable impression on the growing movement focused on the health and well-being of the older adult. He has been invited to serve on the Network of Global Agenda Council by the World Economic Forum for the past 6 years, and he received the Canadian Fitness Professional Association’s “Lifetime Achievement Award” for his contributions to the Canadian fitness industry. In addition, Colin has sparked quite a bit of attention between his publications, television appearances, and radio events, being featured by outlets such as:

  • CNN
  • US News and World Report
  • Wall Street Journal
  • New York Times
  • Los Angeles Times
  • Chicago Tribune
  • Dow Jones Market Watch
  • Money Magazine
  • Entrepreneur Magazine
  • WebMD,
  • The National Post

The phrase “age is just a number” can be interpreted in numerous ways within a life care or continuing care retirement community, though it’s implied that the mindset behind the inevitable aging process tends to stem from whether or not you let age define you and, in some sense, dictate your life decisions.  There will always be things outside of our control, though there is a distinction in attitude and possibility when residents and potential community members stop to consider that there a plethora of options and resources.  “It’s up to you”, as he points out, to utilize them and pursue a higher level quality of life in its full potential.  Not only are there more resources being offered in such CCRC settings, but Colin notes there are also more stories and examples in the media of people nearing or surpassing their early 100s and doing things that truly defy what was considered possible. He references marathon runners and a 105-year old gentleman who successfully rode his bike for 14 hours straight.  Milner does qualify that not every 105-year old will be able to, or will be particularly motivated to, attempt to climb a mountain or skydive, but acknowledges that the possibility can mean a world of difference.